April #publibchat: Privacy, moderated by Alison Macrina

April #publibchat: Privacy, moderated by Alison Macrina

Source: #publibchat: April #publibchat: Privacy, moderated by Alison Macrina

I am very excited to announce that our April #publibchat will be all about privacy, just ahead of ALA’s Choose Privacy Week in early May. Even more exciting is that Alison Macrina (@flexlibris) of the Library Freedom Project will be moderating our chat! Alison is a librarian, internet activist, founder and director of the Library Freedom Project, and a core contributor to The Tor Project.Library Freedom Project is a partnership among librarians, technologists, attorneys, and privacy advocates which aims to address the problems of surveillance by making real the promise of intellectual freedom in libraries.

Please join in on Thursday, April 27th at at 9pm ET / 8 CT / 7 MT / 6 PT to discuss the public library’s role in privacy and how we can protect our patrons.

This is a chat not to miss! Please share widely and join us for the discussion.
Moon Moon Moon by Laurie Berkner with Chords

Moon Moon Moon by Laurie Berkner with Chords

I have always loved Laurie Berkner’s song Moon Moon Moon and when I recently started helping out a pajama storytime, I knew it was time to figure out the chords on my ukulele. I recorded a quick video and have posted the lyrics with chords for either guitar or ukulele below. This is posted with permission from Laurie Berkner.

 

Moon Moon Moon by Laurie Berkner

C
Moon Moon Moon, shining bright

G
Moon Moon Moon, My nightlight (chk… turn it on!)

C                     F
Moon Moon Moon

C       F
I can see

C                     G
Moon Moon Moon

F                     C
You’re taking care of me

 

C
Look up! It’s the moon.

G
Look up! It’s the moon.

C                                        G
Look up! It’s the moon up in the sky.

C
It’s big and round
G
And I have found

C                   G                  C
That it looks just like a pizza pie.

 

Shared with permission from Laurie Berkner. Thank you, Laurie!

April Youth Services News

April Youth Services News

Shared from the CTLS monthly newsletter.

YouthShare: News You Can Use

by Katelyn Patterson

Summer Reading Program Tracking Survey

Libraries that are considering using software to track their summer reading programs frequently ask what systems/vendors other libraries are using and why. We have created a short survey that will allow us to collect this information.

Only 8 questions long and estimated to take between 3-5 minutes, this survey will enable us to understand how CTLS libraries are tracking their summer reading programs, which vendors they are using for software, and why those vendors were chosen. The results will be available and will be useful to those looking to transition to software or those looking for a new vendor. Even if you are using a spreadsheet or paper, please let us know this in the survey.

We appreciate your participation! Please let me know if you have any questions.
You can take our SRP Tracking Survey here.

Thank you!

National Robotics Week

National Robotics Week is coming up from April 8th to the 16th. Started back in 2010, NRW is a way to educate the public about robotics and encourage youth to pursue a career in robotics. For those working robotics into your programs like our Bots & Books libraries, you can register your program on the National Robotics Week website and use some of their resources. There are posters, images you can use for social media, and press releases. And there is a cute Robotics Week mascot named Bleeker! 🙂

http://www.irobotweb.com/~/media/NationalRoboticsWeek/Images/Logos/2017NRWlogoH.jpg?la=en

Total Eclipse of the Sun

On August 21st, my family will be headed north so that we can view the solar eclipse in totality and we are very excited. Even though here in Texas we will only see a partial eclipse, it would still be a great way to bring your community together at the library! Here are some resources:

  • timeanddate.com can tell you based on your location when you can expect to see the maximum eclipse possible. For instance, the maximum we will see here in Austin will be 68% coverage at 1:10pm, though the entire event will take about 3 hours. Consider scheduling a community viewing event around your local viewing information that can be found here.
  • Remember it is dangerous to look directly at the sun! You can apply for some free solar viewing glasses and other resources through Star_Net’s NASA @ My Library program. The deadline to apply is May 1st so apply here today!
  • Astronomers Without Borders is also rolling out an educational program that will provide resources. You can sign up to get information for their initiative here.

 SRP Manual Highlight

Chapter 6 of the Teen Manual, Literary Foundation, includes activities celebrating stories: geeking out about characters, making bookish goodies, and creating stories of your own. On page 61, it lays out what you would need to get teens started doing Stop Motion Animation. This is a great way to get your teens being creative with technology because it doesn’t require much.

You need devices such as tablets or phones (yours or theirs), any number of free apps that can create the animation from photos taken, and supplies to manipulate in the photos! Those supplies can be as simple as Legos, playdough, or yarn. Have a light source like a flashlight, a flashlight app, or a desk lamp to manipulate shadows, too. The manual suggests using an app called Stop Motion Studio which is available for iOS and Android. There is a basic version available for free, but I quickly ran into something I couldn’t do with the basic version. Instead, I used an app called PicPac, only available on Android, to create this video. This 10 second video took me about 40 minutes so you see how time involved it can be. Teens can share their final production with themselves via email to show off to their friends. With their permission, show their productions on social media to entice others to come for future programs!

CSLP PSA Media Available

The Collaborative Summer Library Program has made public service announcement media pieces in both English and Spanish available here for sharing on websites, social media, or with local media. Use this valuable resource to publicize your summer reading program! Do you make your own videos? Please share them with us!

YouthLinks

March YouthShare News

March YouthShare News

Reprinted from the CTLS monthly newsletter.


YouthShare: News You Can Use Anchor

by Katelyn Patterson

 

SRP Manual Highlight

Chapter 9 of the Teen Manual is called Beyond the Library Walls and has many good suggestions for easy projects for patrons to make and then donate to a good cause.

This immediately reminded me of the wonderful work done at the Bee Cave Public Library and their participation in “# 25000 Tuques”, the global charity project to collect hand-knitted hats for Syrian refugees arriving in Canada. Bee Cave collected hat donations and held a knit-in to see how many hats could be made at the library. Over their participation for the last two years, they have donated 896 hats! Amazing work, Bee Cave!

Starting on page 141 is a section called For the Love of Cats and Dogs. There are four different animal toys to make out of old t-shirts that could be donated to local animal shelters or city animal control. My first suggestion is to contact the shelters to ask what is needed to make sure your donation is welcomed! Next, get your teens to work on these easy projects. Use old SRP theme shirts you have, ask the community to donate shirts, or visit a thrift shop to purchase some for cheap.

I chose to make this dog rope toy from page 142. It was easy and fun to figure out. You could make them as small or large as you want. You could easily get more than one toy out of one adult t-shirt.

Check out my SRP2017 Pinterest board where I am saving ideas from the manual and elsewhere. I created an SRP2017 Spotify playlist with suggested music from the manual and other on theme songs and you can access that here.

Please share with me how you plan to use the theme!

YouthLinks

Libraries Are For Everyone

Libraries Are For Everyone

Hafuboti

One of the bestest-best things that has happened as a result of having this blog is that I get to connect with librarians from all over the world. It’s just flat-out awesome. And sometimes those connections lead to a collaboration like what just recently happened with a creative team of librarians from the Saline County Library in Benton, Arkansas. They were preparing for National Library Legislative Day, and wanted to use my images. One thing led to another and we ended up making some pretty sharp-looking images for the occasion. (coughHUMBLEBRAGcoughcough)

Because we all love to share, we decided to post our creations here for anyone/everyone to use!

Without further ado – click on, download, and use any or all of the following images:

Libraries Are For Everyone sign with a rose background | hafuboti.com

Libraries Are For Everyone sign with an orange background - can be used for National Library Legislative Day or Build a Better World 2017 CSLP theme | hafuboti.com

Libraries Are For Everyone sign with a yellow background - can be used for National Library Legislative Day or Build a Better World 2017 CSLP theme OR as a profile picture | hafuboti.com

Libraries Are For Everyone sign with a green background - can be used for National Library Legislative Day or Build a Better World 2017 CSLP theme OR as a profile picture | hafuboti.com

Libraries Are For Everyone sign with a blue background - can be used for National Library Legislative Day or Build a Better World 2017 CSLP theme OR as a profile picture | hafuboti.com

Libraries Are For Everyone sign with a purple background - can be used for National Library Legislative Day or Build a Better World 2017 CSLP theme OR as a profile picture | hafuboti.com

Libraries Are For Everyone sign with a yellow background with 10 diverse representations of library patrons - can be used for National Library Legislative Day or Build a Better World 2017 CSLP theme OR as a profile picture | hafuboti.com

There you have it: something that I would not have done if someone hadn’t reached out to me!  (hint-hint eyebrow wiggle)

I’d love to know if…

View original post 52 more words

Eclipse 2017 Resources for Public Libraries

Eclipse 2017 Resources for Public Libraries

Have any plans to celebrate the eclipse in your community? Here are some resources that might be helpful!

  • Though here in Texas we will only see a partial eclipse, timeanddate.com can tell you based on your location when you can expect to see the maximum eclipse possible. For instance, the maximum we will see here in Austin will be 68% coverage at 1:10pm, though the entire event will take about 3 hours. Consider scheduling a community viewing event around your local viewing information that can be found here.
  •  Remember it is dangerous to look directly at the sun. This grant is providing solar viewing glasses to public libraries. See how you can be involved here:
    • The Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation Provides Public Libraries 1.26 Million Solar Viewing Glasses for the 2017 Solar Eclipse, BOULDER, Colo.–December 16, 2016– The Space Science Institute (SSI) was awarded a grant from the Moore Foundation that will provide 1.26 million solar viewing glasses and other resources for 1,500 public libraries across the nation. They will serve as centers for eclipse education and viewing for their communities. The libraries will be selected through a registration process managed by the STAR Library Education Network (STAR_Net) and its NASA@ My Library project. The project team includes staff at SSI’s National Center for Interactive Learning. The Project Director is Dr. Paul Dusenbery (Director of NCIL). Andrew Fraknoi (Chair of the Astronomy Department, Foothill College), Dennis Schatz (Senior Advisor, Pacific Science Center), and Douglas Duncan (Director of the University of Colorado’s Fiske Planetarium) are co-directors. View The Full Press Release >>

Please share with us if you are planning anything!

November/December Youth News

November/December Youth News

YouthShare: News You Can Use

by Katelyn Patterson

 

Summer Reading Program Updates

What better time to plan your summer than in the dead of winter! You are probably aware that theme of the 2017 Collaborative Summer Library Program manual is “Build A Better World.” I am quite excited about this theme as I think there are lots of possibilities, especially for STEM programs. Kwame Alexander will be the 2017 National Summer Reading Champion. You can find information on the 2017 Teen Video Challenge here.

CTLS will be offering a combination Summer Reading Program workshop and Youthshare at several locations around the state. We are currently working out dates and locations and will be sharing those soon.

The Texas State Library and Archives will be providing a webinar on the Teen Manual on January 5th. You can learn more about that here.

I will highlight an activity from this year’s manual here every month. Keep an eye out for our announcement of dates and locations for our face-to-face workshop to help get you prepared for your best summer yet!

Haul Out the Holly?

It’s that time of year again! “When the world falls in love,” sings Frank Sinatra. Does your library get festive around this time with decorations and special programs? Even though we are in the throes of the (my personal favorite) holiday season, I would like to give you an alternative perspective to consider. In the future, consider going holiday free.

I know what you are thinking. No Santa visit? No special storytime? No Christmas tree in the lobby? No fun Christmas craft? Yes, that is exactly what I am suggesting.

To state why very succinctly, these kinds of programs exclude individuals, specifically those whose religion doesn’t celebrate the day or those who practice no religion at all. And despite the argument that Christmas has become largely secular, this belief varies greatly from individual to individual.

Perhaps no one in your community has made a complaint about this before. Consider that no one has complained because they don’t bother coming to programs in December because they expect to be excluded. Perhaps you don’t know anyone in your community that might be offended by these symbols. Though we strive to know our communities, there is no possible way we can know everyone and their preferences. Perhaps you want to reflect what the majority of your patrons want. While it is most likely safe to assume that only a handful of individuals in your community might be excluded from a special Christmas program, we have always been in the business of fighting for inclusivity for everyone. Simply revisiting ALA’s Library Bill of Rights reminds us of this. In fact, for every plan/program/decision that gets made at your library all year round, take a moment to ask yourself and others on staff, “How could someone be excluded by this choice?”

There are ample opportunities for our patrons to revel in the joys of the holidays. Some radio stations play nothing but Christmas carols. Decorations are at every turn. Special holiday events are happening every day during December in our communities. I know because my calendar is full!

Instead, consider focusing on the broader themes of the season. Decorate with snowflakes or have an adult coloring program with these beautiful snowflake coloring pages from Dover. Offer cookies, hot cocoa, and cider. Or have a program on making upcycled gift wrap, cards, and gifts.

Consider making the library a welcoming place for everyone during the holidays. For some, the public library might be the only place they can go to be free of the festivities.

Further reading:

YouthLinks