Clean blog, clean blog! Move down!

Clean blog, clean blog! Move down!

Friends,

I have had a very hectic year personally. Multiple family emergencies have taken a lot of my attention and extra time. I have had to let #publibchat slide for a few months while I work through all of this. Luckily I haven’t let this get me down too badly. I know I will bounce back when the time is right. In an effort to get my professional self together more, I am migrating this blog over to katelynpatterson.org. If you are following on RSS, please update your feed! I hope that very soon I will be able to offer more there.

Thanks for following and for moving with me!

Librarily yours,

Katelyn

 

Moon Moon Moon by Laurie Berkner with Chords

Moon Moon Moon by Laurie Berkner with Chords

I have always loved Laurie Berkner’s song Moon Moon Moon and when I recently started helping out a pajama storytime, I knew it was time to figure out the chords on my ukulele. I recorded a quick video and have posted the lyrics with chords for either guitar or ukulele below. This is posted with permission from Laurie Berkner.

 

Moon Moon Moon by Laurie Berkner

C
Moon Moon Moon, shining bright

G
Moon Moon Moon, My nightlight (chk… turn it on!)

C                     F
Moon Moon Moon

C       F
I can see

C                     G
Moon Moon Moon

F                     C
You’re taking care of me

 

C
Look up! It’s the moon.

G
Look up! It’s the moon.

C                                        G
Look up! It’s the moon up in the sky.

C
It’s big and round
G
And I have found

C                   G                  C
That it looks just like a pizza pie.

 

Shared with permission from Laurie Berkner. Thank you, Laurie!

April Youth Services News

April Youth Services News

Shared from the CTLS monthly newsletter.

YouthShare: News You Can Use

by Katelyn Patterson

Summer Reading Program Tracking Survey

Libraries that are considering using software to track their summer reading programs frequently ask what systems/vendors other libraries are using and why. We have created a short survey that will allow us to collect this information.

Only 8 questions long and estimated to take between 3-5 minutes, this survey will enable us to understand how CTLS libraries are tracking their summer reading programs, which vendors they are using for software, and why those vendors were chosen. The results will be available and will be useful to those looking to transition to software or those looking for a new vendor. Even if you are using a spreadsheet or paper, please let us know this in the survey.

We appreciate your participation! Please let me know if you have any questions.
You can take our SRP Tracking Survey here.

Thank you!

National Robotics Week

National Robotics Week is coming up from April 8th to the 16th. Started back in 2010, NRW is a way to educate the public about robotics and encourage youth to pursue a career in robotics. For those working robotics into your programs like our Bots & Books libraries, you can register your program on the National Robotics Week website and use some of their resources. There are posters, images you can use for social media, and press releases. And there is a cute Robotics Week mascot named Bleeker! 🙂

http://www.irobotweb.com/~/media/NationalRoboticsWeek/Images/Logos/2017NRWlogoH.jpg?la=en

Total Eclipse of the Sun

On August 21st, my family will be headed north so that we can view the solar eclipse in totality and we are very excited. Even though here in Texas we will only see a partial eclipse, it would still be a great way to bring your community together at the library! Here are some resources:

  • timeanddate.com can tell you based on your location when you can expect to see the maximum eclipse possible. For instance, the maximum we will see here in Austin will be 68% coverage at 1:10pm, though the entire event will take about 3 hours. Consider scheduling a community viewing event around your local viewing information that can be found here.
  • Remember it is dangerous to look directly at the sun! You can apply for some free solar viewing glasses and other resources through Star_Net’s NASA @ My Library program. The deadline to apply is May 1st so apply here today!
  • Astronomers Without Borders is also rolling out an educational program that will provide resources. You can sign up to get information for their initiative here.

 SRP Manual Highlight

Chapter 6 of the Teen Manual, Literary Foundation, includes activities celebrating stories: geeking out about characters, making bookish goodies, and creating stories of your own. On page 61, it lays out what you would need to get teens started doing Stop Motion Animation. This is a great way to get your teens being creative with technology because it doesn’t require much.

You need devices such as tablets or phones (yours or theirs), any number of free apps that can create the animation from photos taken, and supplies to manipulate in the photos! Those supplies can be as simple as Legos, playdough, or yarn. Have a light source like a flashlight, a flashlight app, or a desk lamp to manipulate shadows, too. The manual suggests using an app called Stop Motion Studio which is available for iOS and Android. There is a basic version available for free, but I quickly ran into something I couldn’t do with the basic version. Instead, I used an app called PicPac, only available on Android, to create this video. This 10 second video took me about 40 minutes so you see how time involved it can be. Teens can share their final production with themselves via email to show off to their friends. With their permission, show their productions on social media to entice others to come for future programs!

CSLP PSA Media Available

The Collaborative Summer Library Program has made public service announcement media pieces in both English and Spanish available here for sharing on websites, social media, or with local media. Use this valuable resource to publicize your summer reading program! Do you make your own videos? Please share them with us!

YouthLinks

Libraries Are For Everyone

Libraries Are For Everyone

Hafuboti

One of the bestest-best things that has happened as a result of having this blog is that I get to connect with librarians from all over the world. It’s just flat-out awesome. And sometimes those connections lead to a collaboration like what just recently happened with a creative team of librarians from the Saline County Library in Benton, Arkansas. They were preparing for National Library Legislative Day, and wanted to use my images. One thing led to another and we ended up making some pretty sharp-looking images for the occasion. (coughHUMBLEBRAGcoughcough)

Because we all love to share, we decided to post our creations here for anyone/everyone to use!

Without further ado – click on, download, and use any or all of the following images:

Libraries Are For Everyone sign with a rose background | hafuboti.com

Libraries Are For Everyone sign with an orange background - can be used for National Library Legislative Day or Build a Better World 2017 CSLP theme | hafuboti.com

Libraries Are For Everyone sign with a yellow background - can be used for National Library Legislative Day or Build a Better World 2017 CSLP theme OR as a profile picture | hafuboti.com

Libraries Are For Everyone sign with a green background - can be used for National Library Legislative Day or Build a Better World 2017 CSLP theme OR as a profile picture | hafuboti.com

Libraries Are For Everyone sign with a blue background - can be used for National Library Legislative Day or Build a Better World 2017 CSLP theme OR as a profile picture | hafuboti.com

Libraries Are For Everyone sign with a purple background - can be used for National Library Legislative Day or Build a Better World 2017 CSLP theme OR as a profile picture | hafuboti.com

Libraries Are For Everyone sign with a yellow background with 10 diverse representations of library patrons - can be used for National Library Legislative Day or Build a Better World 2017 CSLP theme OR as a profile picture | hafuboti.com

There you have it: something that I would not have done if someone hadn’t reached out to me!  (hint-hint eyebrow wiggle)

I’d love to know if…

View original post 52 more words

It is snowing in the library!

It is snowing in the library!

This week I got to make some great bookart holiday decorations that I wanted to share.

First I made this totally secular (hmmm….) tree. Very simple, though a little monotonous and time consuming. This tree took me about 45 minutes. But it is the perfect activity for when you need to turn your brain off.

img_20161116_204205

These are the instructions I followed.

Then I got to make these lovely snowflakes from weeded books. I was told how to do this so I took pictures and will include the steps here.

First, close your eyes, bite your lip, and then squeal a little bit while you tear some pages out of a book. Using a paper cutter or scissors, make them square. Like so…

2016-11-30-19-11-41

Fold that in half to make a triangle.2016-11-30-19-11-58

 

And fold that in half again making a smaller triangle.2016-11-30-19-12-15

 

Now fold that triangle into thirds. So fold #1…2016-11-30-19-12-32

 

And then fold #2.2016-11-30-19-48-43

Now visualize a line that would make a smaller triangle. Here I have drawn it for you.

2016-11-30-19-49-01

Cut along that line.

2016-11-30-19-49-18

 

Discard everything but the triangle that is left.2016-11-30-19-49-33

 

Now get creative and cut out a design. Anything goes really as long as you don’t cut all the way through.2016-11-30-19-50-43

 

Unfold and you have your snowflake!2016-11-30-19-45-30

And here is one other decoration that would be great that I haven’t tried yet. These appear to be newspaper that has been cut, folded, and spray painted. They are lovely!

2016-12-01-07-19-592016-12-01-07-20-04

 

A Declaration in Support of Children

A Declaration in Support of Children

Children’s literature may be the most influential literary genre of all. Picture books, chapter books, middle-grade and young-adult novels all serve the most noble of purposes: to satisfy the need for information, to entertain curious imaginations, to encourage critical thinking skills, to move and inspire. Within their pages, seeds of wisdom and possibility are sown.

Therefore we, the undersigned children’s book authors and illustrators*, do publicly affirm our commitment to using our talents and varied forms of artistic expression to help eliminate the fear that takes root in the human heart amid lack of familiarity and understanding of others; the type of fear that feeds stereotypes, bitterness, racism and hatred; the type of fear that so often leads to tragic violence and senseless death.

Our country is deeply divided. The recent election is a clear indication of the bigotry that is entrenched in this nation, of the prevalence of systems…

View original post 2,039 more words

October YouthShare News

October YouthShare News

YouthShare: News You Can Use

by Katelyn Patterson

Ellison Machine Swap

Both CTLS Ellison machines and die sets will be returned to CTLS at our upcoming Membership Meeting. If you are interested in borrowing these for your library, let us know! If someone from your library will be at the meeting, you can pick it up there. If not, we can arrange something else for the near future. Let me know if you are interested in borrowing the Ellison machines or any of our other loanables.

Knowvember


Election season is upon us! A time where reliable information seems scarce and everyone seems to be fact-checking. I can’t think of anyone better equipped to ensure an informed electorate than our librarians! Here is a round up of ideas for helping your community get the information they need to be informed voters.
How will you be serving your community this election season? Are you a voting site? I would love to hear your plans.

YouthLinks:

Upcoming Youth Services Professional Development Opportunities:

September YouthShare: News You Can Use

September YouthShare: News You Can Use

YouthShare: News You Can Use

by Katelyn Patterson

Starting Year 3 of Bots & Books

I am so excited to announce that we will be able to continue our work on the Bots & Books grant during fiscal year 2017, thanks to funding from the Texas State Library and Archives and the Institution of Museum and Library Services. For those that are unfamiliar with this grant, we are getting public libraries all around the state the equipment and training they need to begin offering robotics programming to their youth patrons. So far I have been fortunate to work with 27 libraries around Texas. This year, I am pleased to add the following libraries to our grant:

  • Beeville
  • Bulverde/Spring Branch
  • Cameron
  • Cedar Park
  • Del Rio
  • Dilley
  • Garden Ridge
  • Kingsville
  • Lake Travis
  • Lampasas
  • Library at Cedar Creek Lake/Seven Points
  • Livingston
  • Tye Preston/Canyon Lake
  • Wells Branch

SRP Wrap Up

Summer is over and you are figuring out the stats, right? Well, don’t forget to report your successes to your local media! Don’t just include total number of participants, but any percentage increase from the previous year, if it applies. And speaking of local media, check out this short clip of Barb Langridge from ABookAndAHug.com booktalking about great summer reads during the local news. What better way to get in front of your community!

Please take a moment to take the TSLAC End of Summer Survey to give your feedback. And in early October TSLAC will be sending every main and branch library a packet with a USB drive containing the 2017 Collaborative Summer Library Program manual and artwork for the early literacy, children, teen, and adult programs for those of you who wanted to get started early.

New Youth Services Discussion List

As we begin a new fiscal year at CTLS, I wanted to kick off our new Youth Services Discussion List. Of course, I will share with you any youth related news or events that are coming up that might be helpful, like some of the links or upcoming CE opportunities you will find below. But this is not just a place for me to shout from the rooftop. My hope is that this list will be a place where anyone involved in providing library services to youth can come to ask questions, share ideas, and encourage each other. Think of it as a Pubyac or ALSC-L specific to Texas youth librarians and staff. You can subscribe here if you are interested in joining the discussion.

Additions to the Professional Collection

We are always striving to provide you with quality resources to help your library thrive. In addition to grants and workshops, we also have a Professional Collection of books and other materials that you can check out for free on topics from readers advisory to collection development to customer service to library management. Here are a few materials we recently added that you should check out!

The Very Ready Reading Program from Demco helps you learn how to best incorporate early literacy tips directly into storytime for caregivers to continue on their own. We have purchased all three curriculum for you: Birth-24 Months, Ages 2-3, and Ages 4-5. Each curriculum has several ready-to-go storytime programs with songs, rhymes, and books, as well as printables for presenters and caregivers.

One of the goals of our Bots & Books grant is talking about how we can tie STEM activities to literacy. Cross-curriculum is a school of thought that, to increase understanding and retention in students, we should be teaching more than one subject at once. The National Science Teachers Association recommends the following books for doing just that. The One Minute Mysteries series offers short stories with problems to solve using either math or science. We have purchased all three in the series: 65 Short Mysteries You Solve With Science, 65 MORE Short Mysteries You Solve With Science, and 65 Short Mysteries You Solve With Math. These are great for children 8-12.

Similarly, the Picture Perfect Science series provides ready-to-go lessons that include suggested science-related picture books that are tied to inquiry-based science lessons. We have purchased all three in the series: Picture Perfect Science Lessons, Grades 3-6; More Picture Perfect Science Lessons, Grades K-4th; and Even More Picture Perfect Science Lessons, K-5th. Though these were written with teachers in mind, they are filled with great ideas you can use if you are wanting to incorporate more STEM activities into your storytime.

YouthLinks

Youth Continuing Education Opportunities Coming Up

#BookReview: The Seventh Wish by Kate Messner

#BookReview: The Seventh Wish by Kate Messner

The Seventh WishThe Seventh Wish by Kate Messner

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

middle grade

A school uninvited Kate Messner from an author visit because her latest book, The Seventh Wish, deals with substance abuse. My father is an addict. I felt all of the fear, anger, and disappointment that Charlie feels when her sister’s heroin addiction starts to tear their family apart. Rebecca Stead meets Wonderfalls, this book uses magic to deal with a very real and common problem. Kids need access to this book.

View all my reviews

Pokémon Go: What You Need To Know

Pokémon Go: What You Need To Know

Has your library caught the fever that is Pokémon Go? This phenomenon is catching fast and is getting people out and engaged in their communities. There are many ways that libraries can harness this power for good for their patrons!

Thomas Findley, Adult Services Manager at the Frisco Public Library, gave me permission to share their planning around Pokémon Go:

We here in Frisco are furiously putting together a “flash” social media
campaign to talk about it (as well as the information literacy aspects about
it), but really, it is just in support of bringing players into the library.

We are a pokemon “gym” where people can battle against each other.

The social media campaign for the next two days will be to drum up the
conversation about the library and pokemon go; then, starting on Thursday,
something different will take place: we will be releasing “lures” into the
library for anyone to come by and use. These lures only last for about 30
mins and so we will be setting them off three times a day, starting @ 1pm,
then @ 2:30pm, then the last one @ 4pm.

We will then set off a bundle of them before one of our Basic 3D design
classes on Thursday evening.

We will continue this across the weekend and try to get folks to share
themselves in the library using twitter/Instagram/hashtags.

Our social media team snapped into  action yesterday and here is a quote
from one of their organizing emails from our very own Library Assistant,
Britney Cossey: “If you play Pokemon Go, please try to take some photos from
around the library in fun places (ex. maybe catch a character on a book shelf
or on a One Stop). One of the things that is making this game so popular
(besides it being Pokemon) is that it is so interactive with the real world.
If we could find fun ways to show the characters in our library or on the
square, the better I think the posts will do. If you can get a photo of a
rare or popular character, even better! Also, we’re wanting to use a hashtag
for people to share posts and photos of what they catch, where they catch
them, and their experience of playing the game around the library.”

Combing the viral popularity of this game, a fun  way to share about careful
info lit practices, and engaging a very interesting demographic about the
library as a place to come  to and be, will be fun to see how this fans out
and inspires other things in the staff and users of this library.

Hold onto your hats people (or poke balls)!!!!!

-Thomas

Thomas Finley
Adult Services Manager

The info lit practices Thomas speaks of are the concern over access to personal information on the device. The Skokie Public Library is giving patrons a tour of several nearby PokéStops and talking about neighborhood landmarks. Each of their sessions begins talking about digital and physical safety. The City of Round Rock posted these safety tips on Facebook recently:

13603392_10153734556974142_5528906539294788708_o

This School Library Journal post sums up quite nicely what librarians need to know before getting in the game.