July #YouthShare: News You Can Use

July #YouthShare: News You Can Use

July YouthShare: News You Can Use

by Katelyn Patterson

Save the Date for Showcase!

Please save the date for our annual Central Texas Performer Showcase to be held at the Georgetown Public Library on Friday, November 3rd. Registration to attend will be sent out closer to the event, but mark your calendars so you can see before you hire!

Tell Us About Your Summer

We are getting reports in from around Texas about how everyone’s summer reading programs are going including photos of packed programs and favorite performers and speakers. For example, Clifton is on course to have a record setting number of participants this year! Please let us know how your summer is going. Who have your favorite performers been? Please send me an email and let me know if it is ok to share with others. Thank you!

No Kid Hungry

Low income families are hit hard during the summer when children lose access to school meals, reporting that grocery bills can be up to $300 higher every month. Federal summer meal sites can help ease the burden. Through an organization called No Kid Hungry, you can help connect patrons to these local sites by

  • Texting: Text ‘FOOD’ or ‘COMIDA’ to 877-877 to find a site near you
  • Locating a Summer Meal Site on a map: Go to NoKidHungry.org/SummerMealsto find a site online
  • Calling for more information: Call 1-866-3HUNGRY to find a site and learn more

Youth Mental Health First Aid

As librarians we are always learning new ways that we can be a resource to our communities. For many who struggle with mental health illness and substance abuse, the library could actually be a lifeline. For instance, librarians at the Free Library of Philadelphia’s McPherson Square Branch are currently struggling with a very serious overdose problem. The librarians there are becoming first-responders by administering Narcan to overdose victims, a medication that can block the effects of opioids. A youth services librarian at the Wilton Public and Gregg Free Library in New Hampshire recently spoke with American Libraries Magazine about becoming trained to help youth that are struggling with mental health issues.

The training she took is called Youth Mental Health First Aid and I was able to attend one in New Braunfels this month. Offered by the organization Mental Health First Aid, this was an all day training about how to recognize the signs and symptoms of someone struggling and how to effectively reach out to them to get them the help they need. The training that I attended was aimed specifically at youth, but they have programs for adults, too. You can search for a training near you on their website.

The training was provided at no cost. The instructors are local and provided active crisis intervention during the Wimberley Memorial Day Floods of 2015.

I feel better equipped to recognize a struggling adolescent and how to handle that situation. We will put the manual in the CTLS Professional Collection for those interested in learning more, but I recommend the training for the scenario and peer practice that is provided.

YouthLinks

June #YouthNews

June #YouthNews

June YouthShare: News You Can Use

by Katelyn Patterson

Save the Date for Showcase!

Please save the date for our annual Central Texas Performer Showcase to be held at the Georgetown Public Library on Friday, November 3rd. Registration to attend will be sent out closer to the event, but mark your calendars so you can see before you hire!

SRP, Here We Go!

It is that time again! The months of planning will pay off as you kick off your summer reading program. I know you will all have a very busy and successful summer. Don’t forget the importance of the work you are doing for your community. Without quality programming during the summer months, the summer slide can have consequences that reverberate throughout life. Children can lose one to three months of learning and disadvantaged children are disproportionately affected. As informal learning environments, public libraries are in a wonderful position to give children what they need to succeed and have fun, memorable summers. Focus on the fun, they will continue to come back for more, and you will be setting them up thrive.

Personal Note

Many of you reached out to me after my father’s passing earlier this month. I cannot tell you how much it meant to me to get your emails and notes in the mail with your kind words. Never underestimate your ability to make a difference in other’s lives. I am so proud to work with all of you and appreciate your support.

YouthLinks

May #YouthNews

May #YouthNews

May YouthShare: News You Can Use

by Katelyn Patterson

Save the Date for Showcase!

Please save the date for our annual Central Texas Performer Showcase to be held at the Georgetown Public Library on Friday, November 3rd. Registration to attend will be sent out closer to the event, but mark your calendars so you can see before you hire!

SRP Manual Highlight

For this, our last month of highlights from the SRP manual, I wanted to share a simple bounce rhyme from the Infant chapter of the Early Literacy manual. Bounces are so wonderful for many reasons: caregiver and child interactions, bouncing is fun, and bouncing emphasizes rhythm. This is a great bounce rhyme to always have handy! It is called Dump Truck and can be found on page 33 in the Infant chapter of the Early Literacy manual.

Dump Truck

Dump truck, dump truck, bumpin’ down the road (bounce baby)
Spillin’ gravel as you travel with your heavy load (bounce baby)
Bumpety bumpety bump (bounce baby)
Dump truck, dump truck, dump truck, DUMP! (tip baby over)

Chipotle Reading Rewards

Do you have Chipotle restaurants in your community? Did you know they have a Reading Rewards program? Libraries can apply and will get free kids meal cards sent to them. Food coupons for incentives you can feel a little better about!

Future CSLP Themes

If you know me, you might have an idea of how excited I am about the upcoming CSLP themes. In 2018, the theme will be music with the slogan “Libraries Rock”. And in 2019, the theme will be space to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the first man on the moon. It also probably won’t surprise you that I have already started a Pinterest board for both: music and space.

YouthLinks

  • The Bank Street College of Education’s Center for Children’s Literature has given their awards. See what won!
  • Karen Jensen has done a lot of research on adding screenprinting to her teen makerspace. Here is what worked for her.
  • National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature Gene Luen Yang announced the Read Without Walls challenge, encouraging readers to explore books about characters who look or live differently than you, topics you haven’t discovered, or formats that you haven’t tried. See the announcement and check out the resources here.
  • Now that so many of us are incorporating play and sensory materials into our children’s areas, here are some Best Practices for Cleaning Play and Learn Spaces.
  • Lego-Infused Literacy
  • Check out these beautiful Build A Better World bookmarks made and being shared by a librarian from Minnesota!

Elizabeth Murphy, youth services librarian at the Austin Public Library, retired at the end of April. We wish her the best of luck in her future endeavors! (Katelyn is going to miss you!!)

April Youth Services News

April Youth Services News

Shared from the CTLS monthly newsletter.

YouthShare: News You Can Use

by Katelyn Patterson

Summer Reading Program Tracking Survey

Libraries that are considering using software to track their summer reading programs frequently ask what systems/vendors other libraries are using and why. We have created a short survey that will allow us to collect this information.

Only 8 questions long and estimated to take between 3-5 minutes, this survey will enable us to understand how CTLS libraries are tracking their summer reading programs, which vendors they are using for software, and why those vendors were chosen. The results will be available and will be useful to those looking to transition to software or those looking for a new vendor. Even if you are using a spreadsheet or paper, please let us know this in the survey.

We appreciate your participation! Please let me know if you have any questions.
You can take our SRP Tracking Survey here.

Thank you!

National Robotics Week

National Robotics Week is coming up from April 8th to the 16th. Started back in 2010, NRW is a way to educate the public about robotics and encourage youth to pursue a career in robotics. For those working robotics into your programs like our Bots & Books libraries, you can register your program on the National Robotics Week website and use some of their resources. There are posters, images you can use for social media, and press releases. And there is a cute Robotics Week mascot named Bleeker! 🙂

http://www.irobotweb.com/~/media/NationalRoboticsWeek/Images/Logos/2017NRWlogoH.jpg?la=en

Total Eclipse of the Sun

On August 21st, my family will be headed north so that we can view the solar eclipse in totality and we are very excited. Even though here in Texas we will only see a partial eclipse, it would still be a great way to bring your community together at the library! Here are some resources:

  • timeanddate.com can tell you based on your location when you can expect to see the maximum eclipse possible. For instance, the maximum we will see here in Austin will be 68% coverage at 1:10pm, though the entire event will take about 3 hours. Consider scheduling a community viewing event around your local viewing information that can be found here.
  • Remember it is dangerous to look directly at the sun! You can apply for some free solar viewing glasses and other resources through Star_Net’s NASA @ My Library program. The deadline to apply is May 1st so apply here today!
  • Astronomers Without Borders is also rolling out an educational program that will provide resources. You can sign up to get information for their initiative here.

 SRP Manual Highlight

Chapter 6 of the Teen Manual, Literary Foundation, includes activities celebrating stories: geeking out about characters, making bookish goodies, and creating stories of your own. On page 61, it lays out what you would need to get teens started doing Stop Motion Animation. This is a great way to get your teens being creative with technology because it doesn’t require much.

You need devices such as tablets or phones (yours or theirs), any number of free apps that can create the animation from photos taken, and supplies to manipulate in the photos! Those supplies can be as simple as Legos, playdough, or yarn. Have a light source like a flashlight, a flashlight app, or a desk lamp to manipulate shadows, too. The manual suggests using an app called Stop Motion Studio which is available for iOS and Android. There is a basic version available for free, but I quickly ran into something I couldn’t do with the basic version. Instead, I used an app called PicPac, only available on Android, to create this video. This 10 second video took me about 40 minutes so you see how time involved it can be. Teens can share their final production with themselves via email to show off to their friends. With their permission, show their productions on social media to entice others to come for future programs!

CSLP PSA Media Available

The Collaborative Summer Library Program has made public service announcement media pieces in both English and Spanish available here for sharing on websites, social media, or with local media. Use this valuable resource to publicize your summer reading program! Do you make your own videos? Please share them with us!

YouthLinks

March YouthShare News

March YouthShare News

Reprinted from the CTLS monthly newsletter.


YouthShare: News You Can Use Anchor

by Katelyn Patterson

 

SRP Manual Highlight

Chapter 9 of the Teen Manual is called Beyond the Library Walls and has many good suggestions for easy projects for patrons to make and then donate to a good cause.

This immediately reminded me of the wonderful work done at the Bee Cave Public Library and their participation in “# 25000 Tuques”, the global charity project to collect hand-knitted hats for Syrian refugees arriving in Canada. Bee Cave collected hat donations and held a knit-in to see how many hats could be made at the library. Over their participation for the last two years, they have donated 896 hats! Amazing work, Bee Cave!

Starting on page 141 is a section called For the Love of Cats and Dogs. There are four different animal toys to make out of old t-shirts that could be donated to local animal shelters or city animal control. My first suggestion is to contact the shelters to ask what is needed to make sure your donation is welcomed! Next, get your teens to work on these easy projects. Use old SRP theme shirts you have, ask the community to donate shirts, or visit a thrift shop to purchase some for cheap.

I chose to make this dog rope toy from page 142. It was easy and fun to figure out. You could make them as small or large as you want. You could easily get more than one toy out of one adult t-shirt.

Check out my SRP2017 Pinterest board where I am saving ideas from the manual and elsewhere. I created an SRP2017 Spotify playlist with suggested music from the manual and other on theme songs and you can access that here.

Please share with me how you plan to use the theme!

YouthLinks

November/December Youth News

November/December Youth News

YouthShare: News You Can Use

by Katelyn Patterson

 

Summer Reading Program Updates

What better time to plan your summer than in the dead of winter! You are probably aware that theme of the 2017 Collaborative Summer Library Program manual is “Build A Better World.” I am quite excited about this theme as I think there are lots of possibilities, especially for STEM programs. Kwame Alexander will be the 2017 National Summer Reading Champion. You can find information on the 2017 Teen Video Challenge here.

CTLS will be offering a combination Summer Reading Program workshop and Youthshare at several locations around the state. We are currently working out dates and locations and will be sharing those soon.

The Texas State Library and Archives will be providing a webinar on the Teen Manual on January 5th. You can learn more about that here.

I will highlight an activity from this year’s manual here every month. Keep an eye out for our announcement of dates and locations for our face-to-face workshop to help get you prepared for your best summer yet!

Haul Out the Holly?

It’s that time of year again! “When the world falls in love,” sings Frank Sinatra. Does your library get festive around this time with decorations and special programs? Even though we are in the throes of the (my personal favorite) holiday season, I would like to give you an alternative perspective to consider. In the future, consider going holiday free.

I know what you are thinking. No Santa visit? No special storytime? No Christmas tree in the lobby? No fun Christmas craft? Yes, that is exactly what I am suggesting.

To state why very succinctly, these kinds of programs exclude individuals, specifically those whose religion doesn’t celebrate the day or those who practice no religion at all. And despite the argument that Christmas has become largely secular, this belief varies greatly from individual to individual.

Perhaps no one in your community has made a complaint about this before. Consider that no one has complained because they don’t bother coming to programs in December because they expect to be excluded. Perhaps you don’t know anyone in your community that might be offended by these symbols. Though we strive to know our communities, there is no possible way we can know everyone and their preferences. Perhaps you want to reflect what the majority of your patrons want. While it is most likely safe to assume that only a handful of individuals in your community might be excluded from a special Christmas program, we have always been in the business of fighting for inclusivity for everyone. Simply revisiting ALA’s Library Bill of Rights reminds us of this. In fact, for every plan/program/decision that gets made at your library all year round, take a moment to ask yourself and others on staff, “How could someone be excluded by this choice?”

There are ample opportunities for our patrons to revel in the joys of the holidays. Some radio stations play nothing but Christmas carols. Decorations are at every turn. Special holiday events are happening every day during December in our communities. I know because my calendar is full!

Instead, consider focusing on the broader themes of the season. Decorate with snowflakes or have an adult coloring program with these beautiful snowflake coloring pages from Dover. Offer cookies, hot cocoa, and cider. Or have a program on making upcycled gift wrap, cards, and gifts.

Consider making the library a welcoming place for everyone during the holidays. For some, the public library might be the only place they can go to be free of the festivities.

Further reading:

YouthLinks

August Youth Services News

August Youth Services News

I wrote the following for the CTLS Newsletter. The entire newsletter can be accessed here.

 

YouthShare: News You Can Use

by Katelyn Patterson

Libraries Helping a Healing Nation

Tragedy struck again right here in Dallas since last month when I talked about the occurrence in an Orlando night club. The Dallas Public Library was committed to supporting their community in the days that followed and even helped to preserve the tributes left as a memorial to the fallen officers during a rain storm.

Libraries and supporting organizations all over are playing their part to help communities trying to understand our current national climate. Recently Storytime Underground, a collective of Youth Services Librarians, made public comments about the importance that the library reflect these events and movements to help our communities cope and understand. The Oakland Public Library has a wonderful page of resources called Listen, Learn, Participate: A #BlackLivesMatter Resources Series. Earlier this year, WebJunction provided a 2 part post on Racial Equity in the Library: Part 1: Where to Start and Part 2: Diverse Collections, Programming, and Resources.

And of course, book displays and booklists are being created for the same reasons. I particularly want to point to the We Need Diverse Books Summer Reading Series. In addition to the wonderful graphic design, each post simply and briefly states the title’s similar themes (friendship, relationship with grandparents, searching for family, etc.).

Similarly, as we get closer to November, patrons may want to know where to get the best information on the candidates and the election. Library Journal recently reviewed several Free Resources for an Informed Electorate that you may find useful.

August is Read a Romance Month

Did you know that August is Read a Romance month? At the recent Romance Writers of America conference in San Diego, a presentation was made showing just what a huge impact the Romance genre has on the publishing industry. Do you see romance flying off the shelves at your library? Here is an excuse to introduce the genre to others who haven’t dipped their toe into it.

Library Extension


My new favorite Chrome Extension is called Library Extension. By installing this to the Chrome browser, anytime you browse for books online at websites like GoodReads, Barnes & Noble, and Amazon, Library Extension will let you know if the book or ebook is available at your local library. Borrow and Place a Hold buttons will even take patrons directly to that title in your catalog. They support many libraries (I looked up a few CTLS members) and if you don’t see your library, contact them to let them know! Right now it only works with Chrome but will soon be available for Firefox, too. This is a great way to drive traffic to your site and catalog and could be a great extension of service.

School Library Journal TeenLive Conference

On August 10th, School Library Journal is offering their 5th annual TeenLive Conference, formerly called SummerTeen, which is a free, completely virtual conference discussing teen materials and programming. Keynote speakers are Meg Medina, author of Burn Baby Burn, and Maggie Stiefvater, author of The Raven Cycle. Register to “attend” the event here or follow #SLJTeenLive on Twitter.

YouthLinks